Sunday, July 10, 2011


On the road and loving it...

We are in Port Townsend, Washington, sitting at Point Hudson RV Park, which is right on the water and within five minutes' walk of my favourite bookstore, William James, Bookseller. I went in there this afternoon and picked up a copy of Barbara Kingsolver's Homeland and Other Stories. I thought that was very controlled of me. I generally have trouble getting out of there with fewer than five books. I've found the secret. I didn't look beyond the sale shelf near the front door -- but I'm regretting that now. We've had a lovely time here, catching up on news with Angel May and Angel Spouse, enjoying Port Townsend as always, but we will be leaving tomorrow morning, headed for the other side of Port Angeles -- to visit Roger and Chantal, old friends that we met in Mexico.

Yesterday  I went into a bookstore called Imprints. I bought a birthday card for my sister and a copy of Anne of Green Gables for my great-niece. I asked directions to the post office. The proprietor pointed me to a shop called the Purple Heron, down at the other end of the main street, where there is a little postal outlet.  I walked down there, confirmed that they could mail my packages, and asked for the padded envelopes I would need.  Unfortunately, the young lady at the counter told me, they had run out of the envelopes. I should keep on walking to Don's Pharmacy, where I could buy them.  So off I went -- but I stopped, halfway out the door. I think I said that I would find a place to sit and inscribe the book with my fountain pen, and then I would buy the envelopes and come back. Before I could get the door closed, the young lady said,

"Excuse me, but what's a fountain pen?"



Oh, dear. I felt immensely old.

I went back to the counter, pulled the pen out of my purse, and showed it to her. I gave her a brief history of the fountain pen, beginning with the quill. I told her that a fountain pen's nib forms itself to the handwriting style of its user. I showed her how to fill the pen.  She was enthralled. "I have to have one of those," she said. So I wrote down the URL for xFountain Pens. I made to leave again, but again I hesitated at the door. "Oh," I said, "I should tell you that it can be difficult to fill the pen directly from the ink bottle. You might want to use something like an egg cup as an inkwell. That makes it much easier."  I looked at her, and even before she spoke, I knew just what she was going to say.

"What's an egg cup?"

13 comments:

John Hayes said...

Us older folks are just founts of information! Nice to see the post :)

Sandra Leigh said...

And we're punny, too! Nice to be here, John.

AngelMay said...

It was SO much fun seeing you, Sandra! I'm sorry we walked and walked and walked today and ended up in (of all places) the Mexican restaurant (which is none too good in my estimation). Anyway - just gabbing and gabbing with you has done me a world of good. Love you, girl!

Sandra Leigh said...

Love you too, AM. I've had a great time. You're right. The Mexican restaurant wasn't the best, but it didn't matter. We were off our feet, I got my cup of coffee, and we had a chance to talk. Next time, we'll make sure to go when the proper coffee shops are open.

fieldagentxx said...

Ha! Great story and sign o' the times, fershure.

Rachel Fox said...

Our little one uses an eggcup every morning at home! But then we do live in something of time warp....
x

First50 said...

Delightful story. Odd to be ancient history to kids . . .

Sandra Leigh said...

Rachel, my kids used egg cups too -- Bunnykins egg cups, at that.

Dee Ready said...

Dear Sandra, Age is puzzling. When I was 20, being 50 sounded ancient to me. Now I'm 75 and 50 seems like kindergarten. A mere walk in the park! Not the trek I've been on--surely!!!
I love it when I say "icebox" and my great nieces look at me as if I've just arrived from another planet. "Hey! I was here before you," I think as I describe bringing into the kitchen the block of ice and throwing out the water everyday from the pan under the icebox.
I like to relish those days as I discover the goodness of these days. Life is truly an adventure. Thanks for sharing yours.
Peace from Dee

Komik Oyunlar said...
This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.
Dee Ready said...

Dear Sandra, I tried to post a comment a few days ago, but something happened out there in the ethernet. It must be floating around, waiting for a home. This latest posting of yours make me grin as I remember using the word "icebox" when speaking recently to my great-niece. The term flummoxed her. Now she's using it herself and giggling when she stumps her friends. May your day today be joyous with lots of word exchanges!

Sandra Leigh said...

First50 -- odd indeed, as I really don't feel like a fossil most of the time.

Dee, I've got both your comments now. Thank you. Isn't it strange, looking at 40 and 50-year olds, knowing we'll never see such dewy youth again? :-)

Kathryn Magendie said...

LAUGHING! ... oh dear ... I am old too :-D